NEU Theory

NEU Theory

The Nature of Physical Reality

The Direction of Gravity

Our second tool is understanding the direction of a natural force.

We ask the question, what is the direction of the Earth’s gravitational force that we all experience? Since Newton, gravity has been considered a pull, a universal attractive force between matter.

Neu Theory proposes an experiment to test this undisputed hypothesis.

The diagram shows two half circles, representing the Earth.

 

two half black circles each with two giant cantilevered pendulems with stationary bobs. In one the bobs point to the center of the earth and in the other they are parallel to the support. Direction of Force – The Cantilevered Pendulums Experiment

 

Imagine the Earth’s surface to be a perfect sphere, no atmosphere. Each hemisphere has two giant cantilevered pendulums on a column with stationary bobs subject to Earth’s gravitational force. In A the bobs point to the center of the earth and in B they are parallel to the column.

Question: Which will happen A or B?

This thought experiment may be viable as a real experiment in a scaled down version:

1. Use photons to measure the gap between the strings top and bottom. A smaller gap (A) implies a pull, the same size gap (B) implies a push.
2. Use photons emitted from the cantilevered ball reflecting off a liquid mercury or other reflective surface that follows the curvature of the earth. If the angle of incidence and the angle of reflection are the same gravity is a pull. If the angle of incidence and the angle of reflection are different gravity is a push.

The Neu Theory model uses diagram B in its description of the direction of the Earth’s gravitational force that we all experience, and designates it as one unit of g-rise, a push not a pull. All objects have a g-rise directly proportional to their mass and inversely proportional to their volume.

Neu Theory G-rise is equivalent to the conventional Newtonian gravitational attraction force.

Nothing changes, all formulas work the same, only our perception of what is occurring changes.